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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma: higher cancer incidences found in regions near refineries and plants that release benzene


The incidence of a particular type of blood cancer is significantly higher in regions near facilities that release the chemical benzene into the environment. That is the conclusion of a study published in Cancer, a journal of the American Cancer Society ( ACS ).

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma has been on the rise over the past few decades as industrial production in the United States has expanded. Benzene is one chemical carcinogen linked to blood cancers.

Researchers used data from the Environmental Protection Agency and the US Census Bureau to analyse the geographic patterns of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cases in the state of Georgia between 1999 and 2008.
This group examined the associations between new cases of lymphoma and the locations of facilities, such as petroleum refineries and manufacturing plants, that released benzene into the surrounding air or water.

The investigators found that the metro-Atlanta region, Augusta, and Savannah had the highest incidences of non-Hodgkin lymphoma even when controlling for population size as well as for age, sex, and race demographics of the local region.
Also, the incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma was significantly greater than expected surrounding benzene release sites located in the metro-Atlanta area and surrounding one benzene release site in Savannah. For every mile the average distance to benzene release sites increased, there was a 0.31% decrease in the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

This study is the first to examine the relationship between passive benzene exposure and the incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma at the state population level. ( Xagena )

Source: Cancer, 2013

XagenaMedicine_2013



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